• Bruce Conner
    REPORT, 1963-67
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 13 min

    Following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in November 1963, Conner worked for years on editing the footage, ultimately producing eight different versions. As he told his friend the filmmaker Stan Brakhage, “If the film was completed, then [Kennedy] was as dead as they had made him.” In the final version, shown here, intense flickering lights accompanied by the sound of a radio commentator are combined with newscasts and commercials, mimicking the structure of a television broadcast. The insistent repetitions in the first half defy narrative closure and amplify the media’s role in this traumatic national event. The second half explores the larger landscape of commodification and spectacle, offering a pointed analysis of the tensions within our consumer-driven, televised culture and American mythology.

  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

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  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Bruce Conner
    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67
    1959-67/1996,16mm to 35mm blow-up, color/sound, 3min

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (Beatles Version) 

    Digitally restored, 2016 

    LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-1967) is a visionary travelogue documenting a psychedelic “trip” through rural Mexico and urban America. The film combines street views of San Francisco that Conner and Bob Branaman shot in the late 1950s with scenes of rural Mexico that Conner shot during a series of “mushroom-hunting” excursions between 1961 and 1962, while he and Jean Conner were living in Mexico City. On at least one of these trips, the Conners were joined by Timothy Leary, the ex-Harvard professor and a leading proponent of psychedelic drugs. Whereas an earlier versions of the film was silent and played on a loop, in 1967 Conner added a psychedelic rock ’n’ roll soundtrack, The Beatles’ “Tomorrow Never Knows” off their 1966 album Revolver. The lyrics to the song were famously inspired by Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert’s 1964 book The Psychedelic Experience: A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, which advised those under the influence of psychedelics to “turn off your mind, relax, float downstream.” Arguably among his most hypnotic and visually arresting films, Conner later noted that LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (along with COSMIC RAY) was often rented by advertising agencies who were presumably interested in his use of rapid-fire editing and strobe to generate psychedelic effects and generate subliminal messages. – Dr. Johanna Gosse, Art Historian

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

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  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  • Bruce Conner
    A MOVIE, 1958
    16mm to 35mm blow-up, b&w/sound, 12 min

    (1958, 16mm, b&w/sound, 12min) 

    Music: "Pines of Rome" composed by Ottorino Resphigi Performed by: NBC Orchestra (1955)

    "... a montage of found materials from fact (newsreels) and fiction (old movies). Cliches and horrors make a rapid collage in which destruction and sex follow each other in images of pursuit and falling until finally a diver disappears through a hole in the bottom of the sea - the ultimate exit. The entire thing is prefaced by a girl from a shady movie lazily undressing. By the time A MOVIE is over she has retrospectively become a Circe or Prime Mover." - Brian O'Doherty, The New York Times "Using only found footage, Conner has created one of the most extraordinary films ever made. One begins by laughing at the juxtaposition of cowboys and Indians, elephants and tanks, but soon the metaphor of association becomes serious, as we realize we are witnessing the apocalypse." - Freude

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12