• 17.09.2018 - Alexandre da Cunha and Phillip King: Duologue at Royal Society of Sculptors, London

    17.09.2018 - Alexandre da Cunha and Phillip King: Duologue at Royal Society of Sculptors, London

    Alexandre da Cunha and Phillip King
    Duologue


    Royal Society of Sculptors, London
    27 September - 2 December, 2018
    Private view: 26 September, 6:30-8:30pm

    Prior to the opening of the exhibition, Alexandre da Cunha and Phillip King will share a week of practical exchange at the Royal Society of Sculptors' studio space. Both artists will bring objects, materials and equipment, and between them explore the process of making. For the opening of the exhibition the studio space will be left as it is, with the remnants of the exchange on view.

    In addition, a substantial group of smaller table-based works and maquettes by both artists will be on display illustrating the artists' diverse approach to object making. On the Sculpture Terrace, da Cunha will exhibit a new monumental outdoor work.

    Further information

    Alexandre da Cunha and Phillip King in conversation with Jenni Lomax
    9 October, 6:30-7:30 pm

    The artists will also be in conversation with Jenni Lomax, discussing how the collaboration opened up a dialogue about their work and between their individual practices.

    Book tickets

  • 15.11.2017 - Alexandre da Cunha: Curates group show 'Voyage' at Bergamin & Gomide. Opening 15th November

    15.11.2017 - Alexandre da Cunha: Curates group show 'Voyage' at Bergamin & Gomide. Opening 15th November

    Voyage at Bergamin & Gomide, São Paulo

    Curated by Alexandre da Cunha

     

    15 November, 2017 - 20 January, 2018

    Further information

     

     

  • Alexandre da Cunha: New Public Commission - Plaza (Arcade), 2017

    Alexandre da Cunha: New Public Commission - Plaza (Arcade), 2017

    Alexandre da Cunha: Plaza (Arcade), 2017

     Boston, Autumn 2017

     

    Plaza (Arcade)a new monumental public sculpture by Alexandre da Cunha; commissioned by Samuels & Associates, and to be installed in a new public square in Fenway, Boston.

     

    This will be da Cunha's first permanent public project in the United States. It joins significant public projects by the artist in the United Kingdom and Brazil. 

    The work consists of three industrial concrete rings, reminiscent of ready-made, large-scale subterraneous, civic drainage pipes, placed around the public square. The rings resemble urban furniture, ancient celestial clocks or even mysterious astronomic measuring devices.

     

    Plaza (Arcade), 2017 will be unveiled at a ceremony on 24th September 2017.

    For more information contact Tom Dingle: tom@thomasdanegallery.com

     

  • Alexandre da Cunha: Boom at Pivô, São Paulo

    Alexandre da Cunha: Boom at Pivô, São Paulo

    Alexandre da Cunha: Boom

     

    Pivô, São Paulo

    1 April - 10 June, 2017

     

    Further information

  • Alexandre da Cunha & Caragh Thuring: 'Hallstatt' group exhibition at Fortes D'Aloia & Gabriel Galeria

    Alexandre da Cunha & Caragh Thuring: 'Hallstatt' group exhibition at Fortes D'Aloia & Gabriel Galeria

    Hallstatt

     Group exhibition at Fortes D'Aloia & Gabriel Galeria, São Paulo

    Curated by Maria do Carmo M.P. de Pontes and Kiki Mazzucchelli

    10 December, 2016 - 10 February, 2017

     

    Further information

  • Alexandre da Cunha: Art for Everyone # LondonIsOpen

    Alexandre da Cunha: Art for Everyone # LondonIsOpen

    Alexandre da Cunha

    Art for Everyone #LondonIsOpen

     

    10 November 2016

     

    On 10 November 2016 between 7.30-9.30am Art on the Underground, Transport for London’s contemporary art programme, will hand out to London Underground passengers limited edition posters by leading international artists in North, South, East, West and Central London. The campaign sends a message across London of internationalism, diversity and commonality as part of #LondonIsOpen.

     

    The campaign follows the launch of #LondonIsOpen led by the Mayor of London Sadiq Khan and leading British artist David Shrigley in July, with a major new series of works by top UK and international artists across the Tube network, showing London is open to all.

     

    Phase two of the campaign will see limited edition posters designed by Sol Calero, Alexandre da Cunha, Jeremy Deller, David Shrigley, Mark Titchner and Bedwyr Williams handed out to Underground passengers at Brixton, Kings Cross, Shepherds Bush, Stratford and Tottenham Court Road stations. Each station will have its own exclusive artwork, bringing a unique response to the core theme of openness and diversity.

     

     Together with Tania Bruguera, Hew Locke and Indra Khanna and Gillian Wearing who contributed works for phase one of the campaign, a limited edition postcard series featuring all artworks will be handed out to mark the moment, leaving an extraordinary legacy for #LondonIsOpen. 

     

  • Alexandre da Cunha: Mix (Americana) installed at Laumeier Sculpture Park

    Alexandre da Cunha: Mix (Americana) installed at Laumeier Sculpture Park

    Alexandre da Cunha: Mix (Americana)

     

    Laumeier Sculpture Park, Missouri

     

    Mix (Americana) is installed at Laumeier Sculpture Park in Missouri to mark their 40th anniversary year. It is a full-scale cement mixer, polished and painted in a patriotic red, white and blue. The sculpture has been stripped of its mixing duty on the back of a truck and staged instead as a functional sundial. 

     

    Further information

     

     

  • Hurvin Anderson, Walead Beshty, Alexandre da Cunha and Anya Gallaccio in Making & Unmaking: An exhbition curated by Duro Olowu at Camden Arts Centre

    Hurvin Anderson, Walead Beshty, Alexandre da Cunha and Anya Gallaccio in Making & Unmaking: An exhbition curated by Duro Olowu at Camden Arts Centre

    Making & Unmaking: An exhbition curated by Duro Olowu

     

    Camden Arts Centre, London

    19 June - 18 September, 2016

     

    Making & Unmaking, curated by celebrated fashion designer and curator Duro Olowu. The exhibition brings together over sixty international artists working in diverse media, including Hurvin Anderson, Walead Beshty, Alexandre da Cunha and Anya Gallaccio.

     

    Further information

  • Alexandre da Cunha: Mix II at Rochaverá Corporate Towers

    Alexandre da Cunha: Mix II at Rochaverá Corporate Towers

    Alexandre da Cunha: Mix II 

     

    Rochaverá Corporate Towers

     

    Mix II is Alexandre da Cunha’s first large scale public commission in Sao Paulo. Made using the drum of a concrete mixer truck and cast concrete - objects traditionally used in the production of public buildings - they now become objects to be looked at for their own form. These materials are especially significant in Brazil and to Da Cunha where concrete has played such a significant role both in art and architecture. 

    Da Cunha has described his practice not as ‘making’ but as ‘pointing’. Pointing at existing objects in our everyday surroundings, and highlighting or revealing new and unexpected facets or meanings within them. 

  • Alexandre da Cunha: British Art Show 8 at Leeds Art Gallery

    Alexandre da Cunha: British Art Show 8 at Leeds Art Gallery

    British Art Show 8

    October 9, 2015 - January 10, 2016

    Leeds Art Gallery

     

    Further information

  • Alexandre da Cunha: MCA Chicago Plaza Project

    Alexandre da Cunha: MCA Chicago Plaza Project

    Alexandre da Cunha: MCA Chicago Plaza Project

    July 18, 2015 - July 24, 2016

    Museum of Contemporay Art Chicago

     

    Further information

  • Alexandre da Cunha: Drawing Room Confessions Issue #10, Book Launch

    Alexandre da Cunha: Drawing Room Confessions Issue #10, Book Launch

    Drawing Room Confessions presents: Issue #9 Bruce McLean, Issue #10 Alexandre da Cunha and Issue #11 Richard Wentworth.

    A Book Launch.

    Wednesday, 15 April, 7-8pm


    David Roberts Art Foundation

    Symes Mews

    London NW1 7JE


     

    Further information

     

  • Alexandre Da Cunha and Akram Zaatari: 18th Festival Video Brasil, Sao Paulo

    Alexandre Da Cunha and Akram Zaatari: 18th Festival Video Brasil, Sao Paulo

    The 2013 edition of the Contemporary Art Festival celebrates an important moment for the biennial show. The main Brazilian event dedicated to the artistic production from the geopolitical South (Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, Middle East, Eastern Europe, South and Southeast Asia and Oceania) goes thirty. It is the only Brazilian international festival for contemporary art, with exhibitions, public activities, awards. As in previous editions, a major exhibition establishes a dialogue with the Southern circuit: besides the Southern Panoramas competitive show, this year the highlight is the three decades of experimentation and risk assumed by Videobrasil since 1983, brought together in the exhibition 30 Years.

  • Alexandre da Cunha: Decorum, Musée d'art Moderne de la ville de Paris

    Alexandre da Cunha: Decorum, Musée d'art Moderne de la ville de Paris

    The Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris is highlighting the art of textiles with the exhibition Decorum. This exhibition will feature over a hundred rugs and tapestries created by modern (Francis Bacon, Pablo Picasso) as well as contemporary artists (Dewar & Gicquel, Vidya Gastaldon). 

    Decorum is a chance to discover the often unknown ventures into weaving by both major artists of the twentieth century, as well as lesser known artists (such as Guidette Carbonell). The exhibition also includes anonymous works from different time periods and regions in order to underscore meaningful similarities and differences.

    The virtues of carpets and tapestries are numerous: visual and tactile, artistic and functional, they are also readily transportable (Le Corbusier qualified the tapestries as 'Muralnomad'). They transcend the usual limitations of decorative arts and interior design.

     

    Until the late 19th century, painters like Lotto, Holbein and Delacroix restricted themselves to drawing tapestry cartoons or including Oriental carpets in their pictures. Over the course of the 20th century, however, the European avant-garde revolutionized textile art and practice; artists began weaving their own rugs, inspired by works from earlier periods or drawing upon ethnic and geometric motifs. 

    Since the 1960s, carpets and tapestries often bear a political or feminist message.  Beginning with the new millennium, they have grown in popularity. Young contemporary artists like Caroline Achaintre and Pae White are now producing original works that blend tradition, non-Western influences and modernity, for instance through the use of innovative techniques such as digital weaving.

    This exhibition challenges the preconceived notion of tapestry as a minor or anachronistic art form. The exhibition also recalls a little known aspect of the history of the MAM that had its own Textile Art department in the 1980s.

    As guest artistic director, theLondonbased artist Marc Camille Chaimowicz has designed the exhibition in collaboration with architect Christine Ilex Beinemeier. The ambient music (“furnishing music”) serving as the exhibition’s audio backdrop is a playlist proposed by aesthetic lecturer Jean-Philippe Antoine.

    The richly illustrated catalogue is co-published with Skira-Flammarion (with graphic design by Huz&Bosshard).

  • Alexandre da Cunha: The World Turned Upside Down - Buster Keaton, Sculpture and the Absurd, Warwick Art Centre

    Alexandre da Cunha: The World Turned Upside Down - Buster Keaton, Sculpture and the Absurd, Warwick Art Centre

    Curated by Simon Faithfull and Ben Roberts, 'The World Turned Upside Down' places the work of over twenty international artists working in film, sculpture, installation art and performance in direct relation to Buster Keaton's films to track a lineage from the melancholic and at times anarchic comedy of Keaton to the dry wit of conceptual practice.

     

    By examining Keaton's approach to art through making - the processes of failure, risk and repetition - the exhibition also establishes a nuanced presentation of the developmental relationship between slapstick film, sculpture and performance and highlights parallels within modern and contemporary sculptural practice which continue to resonate today.

     

    The exhibition features work of conceptual artists working in film, photography, sculpture, installation art and performance; by historical and contemporary, established and emerging artists. These include Bas Jan Ader, Angus Braithwaite and Fred Lindberg, Marcel Broodthaers, Alexandre da Cunha, Simon Faithfull, Peter Fischli David Weiss, Brian Griffiths, Jeppe Hein, Sofia Hulten, William Hunt, Tehching Hsieh, Hayley Newman, Roman Signer, Richard Wentworth, Richard Wilson, John Wood and Paul Harrison.

     

    'The World Turned Upside Down' is a Mead Gallery exhibition which has been supported by The Henry Moore Foundation.

  • Alexandre da Cunha and Hurvin Anderson: Homebodies, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

    Alexandre da Cunha and Hurvin Anderson: Homebodies, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

    Homebodies presents work by contemporary artists who examine the space of the home, both literally and metaphorically, as an integral site for making art. Featuring an expansive range of artworks, some made of materials found in the domestic sphere and others that represent or re-create a sense of domesticity, Homebodies demonstrates a new understanding of how the domestic context has influenced the creation and interpretation of contemporary art. The exhibition incorporates various media, including paintings by Hurvin Anderson; sculptures by George Segal and Rachel Whiteread; installations by Alexandre da Cunha and Do Ho Suh; photography by Marina Abramović, Barbara Kruger, Doug Aitken, and Adrian Piper; video by Martha Rosler, Rivane Neuenschwander, and Guy Ben-Ner; and a living-room environment by Dzine that doubles as a nail salon. The exhibition is likewise international in its reach, drawing from six continents to include more than forty artists at various stages in their careers.

     

    The domestic setting has been a crucial site (and recurring subject) of artistic production-a parallel track and occasionally a counterpoint to more commonly celebrated contexts such as the artist's studio and the public sphere. In fact, many artists, for personal or financial reasons, work at home, and for those artists the home often becomes the subject and source of their artwork. Although this exhibition focuses on artists working from the late 1960s to the present, there are notable precedents in art history dating back as early modernism. Major artists in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including Vincent van Gogh and Henri Matisse, frequently depicted domestic interiors as sites of psychological reflection and a potent metaphor for social or historical concerns. Later, in the 1970s, the feminist movement exposed the home as a site of identity production and interrogation, putting pressure on the presumably male cliché of the heroic artist creating alone in his studio. In recent years, as commerce and communication have become increasingly globalized, artists have paradoxically turned inward, examining the idea of "home" in more localized contexts, recognizing it as an arena of social development and an indicator of economic trends, especially as more and more artists confront the recent crises in housing and urban development in their work.

     

    The exhibition is organized in three sections. The first, Architectonics, includes works that represent interiors, use fragments of private homes, or are produced on a small scale, often using humble, domestic materials. The second section, Division of Labor, presents artworks that replicate a "cottage industry" scale of production or refigure activities such as care and cleaning, and demonstrates the lasting impact of the feminist movement on artists of any gender expression. Finally, the third section, Psychogeographies, considers how private interiors can become a metaphor for interior mental spaces, oftentimes fraught with anxiety and upheaval.

     

    This exhibition is organized by Naomi Beckwith, Marilyn and Larry Fields Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

  • Alexandre da Cunha: Homebodies, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

    Alexandre da Cunha: Homebodies, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

    Homebodies presents work by contemporary artists who examine the space of the home, both literally and metaphorically, as an integral site for making art. Featuring an expansive range of artworks, some made of materials found in the domestic sphere and others that represent or re-create a sense of domesticity, Homebodies demonstrates a new understanding of how the domestic context has influenced the creation and interpretation of contemporary art. The exhibition incorporates various media, including paintings by Hurvin Anderson; sculptures by George Segal and Rachel Whiteread; installations by Alexandre da Cunha and Do Ho Suh; photography by Marina Abramović, Barbara Kruger, Doug Aitken, and Adrian Piper; video by Martha Rosler, Rivane Neuenschwander, and Guy Ben-Ner; and a living-room environment by Dzine that doubles as a nail salon. The exhibition is likewise international in its reach, drawing from six continents to include more than forty artists at various stages in their careers.

     

    The domestic setting has been a crucial site (and recurring subject) of artistic production-a parallel track and occasionally a counterpoint to more commonly celebrated contexts such as the artist's studio and the public sphere. In fact, many artists, for personal or financial reasons, work at home, and for those artists the home often becomes the subject and source of their artwork. Although this exhibition focuses on artists working from the late 1960s to the present, there are notable precedents in art history dating back as early modernism. Major artists in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including Vincent van Gogh and Henri Matisse, frequently depicted domestic interiors as sites of psychological reflection and a potent metaphor for social or historical concerns. Later, in the 1970s, the feminist movement exposed the home as a site of identity production and interrogation, putting pressure on the presumably male cliché of the heroic artist creating alone in his studio. In recent years, as commerce and communication have become increasingly globalized, artists have paradoxically turned inward, examining the idea of "home" in more localized contexts, recognizing it as an arena of social development and an indicator of economic trends, especially as more and more artists confront the recent crises in housing and urban development in their work.

     

    The exhibition is organized in three sections. The first, Architectonics, includes works that represent interiors, use fragments of private homes, or are produced on a small scale, often using humble, domestic materials. The second section, Division of Labor, presents artworks that replicate a "cottage industry" scale of production or refigure activities such as care and cleaning, and demonstrates the lasting impact of the feminist movement on artists of any gender expression. Finally, the third section, Psychogeographies, considers how private interiors can become a metaphor for interior mental spaces, oftentimes fraught with anxiety and upheaval.

     

    This exhibition is organized by Naomi Beckwith, Marilyn and Larry Fields Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

  • Alexandre da Cunha: Alexandre da Cunha, Michael Rey, Michael Williams, B.Wurtz, Office Baroque Gallery

    Alexandre da Cunha: Alexandre da Cunha, Michael Rey, Michael Williams, B.Wurtz, Office Baroque Gallery

    Participating artists:

     

    Alexandre da Cunha
    Michael Rey
    Michael WIlliams
    B.Wurtz

  • Alexandre de Cunha, 'Garden of Reason': Ham House

    Alexandre de Cunha, 'Garden of Reason': Ham House

    Garden of Reason was an exciting season of contemporary art held at Ham House and Garden over the Summer of 2012.

    The 17th-century garden at Ham served as inspiration and setting for eight major commissions, ranging from sculpture to film, sound pieces and performance, as well as a series live art events. The exhibition was further animated by a series of talks and tours.

    The project also offered the chance for Ham House and Garden to get involved with its local community, and the interaction programme worked with local groups to produce fantastic new interpretations of the garden and even organise a unique evening event in August.